Exhibition time at the Redfern Centre: 31 May – 28 June

Members of Salcombe Art Club support the Friends of the Redfern by providing a display of artwork for sale in the waiting area.

If you purchase one, a proportion of the sale is donated to this worthwhile local charity.

 

Exhibition time at the Redfern Centre: 31 May – 28 June

This is my eighth exhibition at the Redfern Centre and I have chosen these five paintings to exhibit.

Provident

Provident is a retired Brixham trawler and has been a much-loved training ship for many generations of novice sailor.

Provident £175

Church of St Peter, Buckland-tout-saint

This pretty church stands high on the hill and commands excellent views across surrounding countryside. Church of St Peter is a rare painting in that there are no sailing craft and no sea to be seen. And, there’s a bit of multimedia going on too.

the-church-of-st-peter-buckland-tout-saints

The Church of St Peter Buckland-tout-saints £225

North Hallsands

North Hallsands has some contemporary houses with spectacular views facing east towards Dartmouth. Its beach changes dramatically every winter.

North Hallsands £225

Dawn at New Bridge

The bridge at Bowcombe offers an enchanting mooring for boats of all kinds. In Dawn at New Bridge, an early morning pink mist signals a fine day.

Dawn at New Bridge £250

Harvest Reaper II

I have painted the Harvest Reaper AKA the South Sands ferry so many times. Here, it’s backdrop is Fishermans beach.

Harvest Reaper II £350

For more details of each painting, click on the image.

Other opportunities to see my work

I have five more paintings on display in the Salcombe Art Club Exhibition. Click here for more details.

And, by arrangement you are welcome to a private viewing of paintings in my home, at the Beacon House Gallery. To arrange a convenient time, contact me.

Botanical garden

Postcard from Madeira: The Botanical Garden

Anne and I first visited the Botanical Garden in Funchal on our honeymoon, nine years ago. It was March and very wet. I have photos, somewhere, of us: drenched, but still smiling.

Each time we return to Madeira, we make a point of taking the cable car and visiting either the Tropical Garden or, via a second cable car, the Botanical Garden.

This trip, in May, sunny and dry, it was the turn of the Botanical Garden again.

 

Travelling by cable car

You can take a taxi, or go by bus, but the best way to travel to the Botanical Garden is via the cable car.

The views from the cable car are spectacular, and I start taking photos straight away.

These are jacaranda mimosifolia trees – with the most beautiful purple flowers. They are to be seen a lot along the roadside in Funchal and elsewhere on the island.

 

In the Botanical Garden

Opened in 1960, the 20-acre site now known as Jardim Botânico da Madeira was previously part of an estate belonging to the family of William Reid, founder of the famous Reid’s hotel, where you can have afternoon tea in return for an arm and a leg!

Set on a steep hillside, the paths zigzag through various collections: Madeiran indigenous and endemic species, and arboretum, succulents, topiary, medicinal and aromatic plants, and palm trees of all shapes and sizes.

FrogArriving by cable car, we made our first port of call about half way down, at the cafe. Set alongside ornamental ponds boasting hundreds of lily pads, we enjoyed a romantic snack, looking out across Funchal beneath us to the sea beyond, accompanied by the mating calls of frogs.

Suitably refreshed, we then set off to explore the gardens beneath us, starting with the indigenous and endemic species: a mass of brightly coloured flowers.

Slowly, we made our way down to the very bottom, taking photos of everything and anything we saw.

 

Madeiran indigenous and endemic species

Below the ornamental garden (the featured image above), there are these stunning ornamental grasses, swaying gently in the breeze.Grasses

Behind them you can see the greenhouses.

 

The cacti

Clearly the Madeira climate suits cacti. They grow to an enormous height.

The topiary

Who has the time for this artistry? Answer: the team of gardeners at the Botanical Garden!

The palms

In Madeira, we are staying at Pestana Palms, one of the group of Pestana hotels. The gardens are naturally full of palms … but, in the Botanical Garden, they are huge.

This photo includes me, seated on a hot stone bench, simply to demonstrate the size of the palm beside me.

Palms

We then trekked all the way up to the top of the gardens again. Caught the first cable car for our journey back home, walked uphill to the next cable car station … Hard work, but worth it …

PS The gardens also include a bird park (the Louro Bird Park) and a three-room Natural History Museum – neither of which we managed to visit this time.

 

Back at our apartment: painting

I’ve never painted a frog before, and probably never will again. but, it was fun to try!

Now, if you compare my sketch with the photo above, you’ll see that I’ve used artistic licence in my choice of greens. Indeed, one of the lily pads is more yellow than green.

Also, where there was shade, I’ve used violet. Why? Violet is the appropriate colour to use opposite yellow, according to the colour wheel.

And, I’ve used both yellow and violet on the frog’s back.

This post is one of my POSTCARD series, sharing all things ART with you when I go travelling.

Postcard from Funchal, Madeira: Orchids and chocolates

orchidsOrchids and chocolates?

Most of my paintings include the sea, the sky, and boats and are based on photographs taken close to my home town of Salcombe.

When I’m on holiday, I have different subjects at my disposal.

Anne and I are staying near Funchal in Madeira and were persuaded to join an excursion which boasted Chocolates and Orchids. How could we resist?

 

First stop: Orchids at Quinta da Boa Vista

Qorchidsuinta da Boa Vista boasts the best orchid collection on show all year round and we were given a guided tour by our host, owner, Patrick through a greenhouse packed with hundreds of colourful varieties.

While he explained how to care for them (do not overwater!), we took photos. The featured image above is just one of many.

Here are some more.

The variety of colours and sizes was a feast for our eyes.

There were huge blooms, with no fragrance …

orchidsAnd tiny blooms with an intense scent …

Both, tactics to attract insects for pollination purposes.

Some has a single magnificent flower – others were grouped on a single stem.

All of them were beautiful.

And then we enjoyed tea and cake in the delightful garden overlooking the town of Funchal.

 

Next stop: handcrafted colourful flavourful chocolates

Tchocolateshe next stop on our excursion was into the centre of Funchal, to Rua da Queimada de Baixo, nº 11 where the chocolatier UauCacau have a coffee shop and display their colourful chocolate selection.

We sat outside in the sunshine and were presented with a tasting tray of six exquisite chocolates, together with a glass of Madeira  wine.

Our tour guide explained the methods used in the factory below the shop, and the origins of the delicious fillings: mango, banana, passion fruit, madeira rum, …

We were then invited into the chocolate coloured (dark!) interior to choose what we wanted to purchase.

chocolatesA work of art! We were hard pressed to choose 20 to take back to our apartment.

 

Back at the apartment: painting!

Of all the orchids I’d captured on my camera, I chose this one to paint first.

orchids

Why? 

colour wheelI chose a pink orchid because so much of the background was green and green is the complementary colour to pink.

This would, in theory, make the petals stand out better than for any other colour of orchid.

Here is another sketch.

The orchid is orange and note that I have used a blue wash in the background, blue being the complementary colour of orange on the colour wheel.orchids

It’s unlikely I’ll take the subject of orchids any further, although we are tempted to fill the house with these wonderful blooms once we are back home.

My ‘market’ back in Salcombe is the usual diet of sea and sailing – but it was a pleasant way to spend the afternoon … playing with my watercolour kit.

This post is one of my POSTCARD series, sharing all things ART with you when I go travelling.

Postcard from Funchal, Madeira

We are on holiday in Madeira!

Anne and I arrived last week at one of our favourite destinations: Pestana Palms hotel on the island of Madeira. We first came here together for our honeymoon in 2009 and have returned several times since then. One of the main attractions is the ‘Cheers’ bar with its longstanding team of bar staff who always greet us with a smile as in the featured image above.

 

What do we do, while holidaying in Madeira?

We usually arrive tired and in need of a rest, so sleep is an essential ingredient of any holiday for us. But then, away from our usual routine, we make time for exercise.

Madeira GauloIn Madeira, there are many lavada walks. These are paths that run alongside the network of waterways – narrow channels – that carry water from the mountains down to the coast.

On our honeymoon, we embraced these walks with a vengeance. Older and wiser, we now opt for the more gentle excursions.

Last Friday, for example, we visited the pretty village of Gaulo and, with the aid of excellent guide, enjoyed views of the countryside during a 60-minute stroll along the Lavada dos Tornos. I took lots of photos, and Anne took this shot of me.

Our guide explained the history of the region, their dependence on water (hence the lavadas) and how they created the many terraces to make the most of the steep terrain.

It reminded us of the work we’ve had done at home, with 23 piles needed to stabilise our sloping rear garden, and a huge retaining wall of concrete to hold back a neighbour’s garden. For us, a small team of builders, with diggers, completed the work in a matter of months.

In Madeira, the construction of the terracing was painstaking work, done by hand, stone by stone, as the slopes were too steep for horses or donkeys, and the ground not accessible for machinery. All the men worked on the terracing and it took them years …

And then we had tea and cake – all traditional recipes – at the home of the guide. A wonderful half day excursion …

 

My holiday studio in Madeira

It’s not all relaxation. We have ‘work’ to do as well.

I’ve set up a ‘studio’ on the balcony already, and the sun is so bright, I’m in relief. I promise you, I am smiling.

Madeira balcony

Here is a close up of the table, set out with my essentials.

Madeira studio kit

Holidaying in Madeira: a time to sketch

The image above is of a particularly elegant craft that made its way out of Funchal, the capital of Madeira, past our balcony. I took many photos of its passage across a magnificent sky. Plus I have the sketch. When I return home, I may create a larger image of this scene.

I have two sketch books with me but, so far, I’ve only used the smaller of the two. The image below is of the hotel itself with the pool in the foreground.

Madeira sketch books

It’s wonderful to paint in the open air … for the temperatures to be high enough to be comfortable without having to apply sun screen every five minutes.

And to have, in the background, the sound of waves breaking on the seashore. Bliss!

This post is one of my POSTCARD series, sharing all things ART with you when I go travelling.

Brighton pavilion

Postcard from Brighton

Anne and I enjoy visiting art galleries wherever we are but, today, in Brighton, we discovered art on the streets, in the shop windows.

 

Walking around Brighton: An irregular choice?

Instead of visiting the Brighton Pavilion, we wandered along the Laines, and discovered the most amazing shoe shop: Irregular Choice.

Brighton shoes

Such amazing colour combinations!

Brighton shoes

 

Walking around Brighton: a piece of cake?

We wandered on … to discover Choccywoccydodah. This is a cake!

And this is a cake too!

Walking around Brighton: kids’ stuff?

And we wandered on … to discover the North Road Timber Company. Not only could you pop in to buy a length of 2 by 2, or a ready made door, you could buy house signs and toys.

Brighton wood

Hundreds of toys!

Brighton wood

 

Walking around Brighton: notching up 6500 steps

One of the reasons for our perambulation was to kickstart our holiday with a day of walking. Some exercise.

Instead, or as well, we witnessed lots of art.

I’ve shared here the shop windows. There was also art on the streets – the people themselves were colourful: their eccentric fashions, the body piercings, the tattoos … a-ma-zing.

This post is one of my POSTCARD series, sharing all things ART with you when I go travelling.

JANETTE JAGGER – ARTIST DOWN UNDER

Janette Jagger

In the Bush

Janette Jagger and I are members of SHAF (South Hams Art Forum). We both take part in the annual SHAF Arts Trail. This year, that’s 13-28 October. Put those dates in your diary!

She uses oils, acrylic, pen and wash, and water colour to suit the particular place. Her paintings range from the empty landscapes of the Red Centre of Australia to the crowded beach at Bantham full of holidaymakers enjoying themselves.

 

What is special about Janette Jagger’s work?

Janette’s style is larger-than-life super-colourful and fun.

Janette has travelled widely in France, Spain, the United Kingdom and Brazil, where the brilliant tropical colours changed her paintings.

She now lives and paints in Devon, a complete contrast to the desert and the tropics, and loves the coastal landscapes of the South Hams.

Janette Jagger

Near Cober Pedy

Janette also loves Cornwall and Scotland.

Janette says: My aim is to capture the feeling of different places and to convey their joy and beauty in whatever medium suits them.

 

 

Why ‘artist down under’?

Janette was born in the mining town of Broken Hill in the Australian desert. The hot earth colours and brilliant blue, cloudless skies of her birthplace in Australia still influence her colour palette.

Janette says: I was born in the Australian desert and I just love the hot colours in Australia and the vast spaces with no sign of humans. It was a real adventure traveling for five months in a small camper van. We did break down 70 kms from mobile reception and few cars on the road. But the sense of vast, empty space is wonderful.

 

The JANETTE JAGGER – ARTIST DOWN UNDER exhibition
Janette Jagger

Ulutu

This colourful exhibition is at Harbour House, Kingsbridge: 15-20 Ma

The gallery space is open daily: 10am to 5pm.

Janette says: It’s not all about Australia. I will have local paintings as well as other places.

 

Free talk at 2.30pm on on Saturday 19 May

There is a free talk on ‘Traveling with the grey nomads’.

In the southern states of Australia, when winter sets in, the retired folks jump in their camper vans or caravans and head north to the warmth of the tropics. Hence the name ‘grey nomads’.

 

More about Janette

Janette Jagger has painted all her life. She has been accepted by the Association of British Naïve Artists and will exhibit in St. Ives in October 2014.

If you have an exhibition which you’d like me to publicise, please let me know.

I’m very happy to promote fellow artists!

Elaine Sibley at The Gallery Project, Noss Mayo

Elaine SibleyElaine Sibley has an exhibition at The Gallery Project in Noss Mayo, on now until 10 May.

The gallery is open Saturdays 10am – 4pm but a local artist works at the forge Wednesdays and Thursdays 10am-4pm and you are welcome to pop in.

 

Where is The Gallery Project, Noss Mayo?

The Forge
Bridgend
Noss Mayo
Plymouth
PL8 1DX

Tel: 01752 873150

map to The Forge

Mothercombe beach 60 x 60

Mothercombe beach 60 x 60

 

How do I know Elaine Sibley?

Elaine and I are members of SHAF (South Hams Art Forum). We both take part in the annual SHAF Arts Trail. This year, that’s 13-28 October. Put those dates in your diary!

Elaine and I also exhibited together at the Contemporary Passions Exhibition in June of last year and that’s where I first saw some of her work: her beautiful hand forged silver jewellery.

In this exhibition, we meet Elaine, the painter.

Like me, Elaine is passionate about landscape. Unlike me, her style is incredibly adventurous!

 

What’s special about Elaine Sibley’s work?
Western Beacon from South 60 x 60

Western Beacon from South 60 x 60

Elaine’s contemporary landscapes emerge from natural surroundings; namely Dartmoor and the local coastline.

She is aware of the ever changing weather and conditions on Dartmoor and attempts to capture the effect this has on light and colour in her paintings.

She walks, sketches and takes photographs.

Back in the studio, she is currently enjoying the immediacy of acrylics and uses texture and a variety of tools to try to convey the mood and atmosphere of the place rather than a true representation.

 

More about Elaine Sibley

Elaine lives and works on the edge of Dartmoor.

Elaine studied at Plymouth College of Art and then the College of St Mark & St John where she gained a PGCE.

Beyond Western Beacon 60 x 60

Beyond Western Beacon 60 x 60

She taught Design and Technology for 20 years while designing and making silver jewellery which she continues to sell through local galleries and open studios.

Ugborough Beacon 60 x 60

Ugborough Beacon 60 x 60

Since retiring from teaching in 2016, Elaine  has found time to experiment and expand her work and has developed a passion for painting.

To see more of Elaine’s images, visit her Facebook page.

 

If you have an exhibition which you’d like me to publicise, please let me know.

I’m very happy to promote fellow artists!

Brownston Gallery: South West Academy Exhibition 16 March – 14 April 2018

I attended the private viewing of the South West Academy Exhibition at The Brownston Gallery on Thursday 15 March – some time ago now!

Despite the pouring rain, it was a packed out event, and I was delighted to see the work of two of my favourite painters on display: Greg Ramsden and Richard Thorn.

 

Greg Ramsden at the Brownston Gallery

Brownston GalleryIn 2017, Greg Ramsden was artist-in-residence at the Tonic Gallery (attached to the Salcombe Gin Company) in Island Street, Salcombe and I much enjoyed visiting that exhibition and admiring his work.

He has several on display at The Brownston Gallery and this ‘Yeomans Boatyard’ is an excellent example of his monochrome style.

You can see more of his work on Greg’s website. I was interested to read that he completes one painting before moving on to the next. Maybe I should try that!

 

Richard Thorn at the Brownston Gallery

Brownston GalleryI have an original Richard Thorn watercolour painting (called The Land Time Forgot) taking pride of place in my dining room.

There were several of his on show at the Brownston Gallery, including this one of Pendeen Lighthouse, featured in the brochure. You can see more on his website.

I just love his use of colour!

 

Where is the Brownston Gallery?

The Brownston Gallery is in the centre of Modbury.

36 Church Street · Modbury · Devon · PL21 0QR  Call 01548 831338 | art@thebrownstongallery.co.uk

Open: Mon-Sat:10am to 5pm Wed:10am to 1pm

Who else is featured in this exhibition?

As well as those by my favourite two artists, you can see works by David Norman, Joanna Vollers, Jenny Pymont, Allan Cotton, Karen McEndoo, Lar Cann, Paula Youens, Ken Cosgrove, Sally Lancaster, Tony Williams, Paul Creek and John Hurford.

You still have time to visit; the exhibition ends on Saturday, 14 April.

OPEN! Salcombe Art Club Summer Exhibition 2018

Last Thursday, I attended the Salcombe Art Club Summer Exhibition Preview evening, at which cheques were distributed to two local worthy causes.

Our chairlady, Naomi Ainsley, and our esteemed Mayor, Michael Fice, made the presentations.

There are lots more photos on the Salcombe Art club’s page on Facebook and I’m sure there will be a report in the local Gazette in due course.

Meanwhile …

 

My paintings on display in the Summer exhibition

OSummer exhibitionn display in the Loft Studio, there are now five of my paintings:

On the left, from top to bottom:

 

On the right, from top to bottom:

 

The tourists are now here for the Easter and we hope many of them will visit the Loft Gallery to see the wonderful display of work by local artists.

As members of the Salcombe Art Club, we are invited to display our creations. If sold, 15% of the price goes the to Salcombe Art club.

This ‘income’ pays for the running costs, but also funds our charitable gifts to local causes.

Which brings me back to the beginning of this post. This year’s beneficiaries were Erme Valley Riding for the Disabled and Kingsbridge Food Bank.

 

Dates for your diary during the Summer exhibition

I will be stewarding on the following dates.

  • Wednesday 16 May: 11am – 2pm
  • Wednesday 1 August: 11am – 5pm
  • Wednesday 8 August: 11am – 5pm
  • Sunday 12 August: 11am – 5pm
  • Saturday 18 August: 2pm – 5pm
  • Sunday 19 August: 11am – 5pm
  • Wednesday 26 September: 11am – 5pm

 

Pop in to meet me in the flesh!

Salcombe Art Exhibition 2018 starts Good Friday at 11am

Five of my newest crop of paintings are currently being hung for the Salcombe Art Club Summer Exhibition which opens to the public on Good Friday at 11am.

I kept back only one: 138 Merlins Crossing the Bar.

Contact me to arrange a private viewing if you’d like to see that one.

 

SALCOMBE ART CLUB SUMMER EXHIBITION
FRIDAY 30 MARCH – SATURDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 2018

Open 7 days a week from 11am until 5pm. Admission is free.

I will be stewarding on the following dates.

  • Wednesday 16 May: 11am – 2pm
  • Wednesday 1 August: 11am – 5pm
  • Wednesday 8 August: 11am – 5pm
  • Sunday 12 August: 11am – 5pm
  • Saturday 18 August: 2pm – 5pm
  • Sunday 19 August: 11am – 5pm
  • Wednesday 26 September: 11am – 5pm

 

Pop in to meet me in the flesh!

 

Affordable Art

All six news images are available as fine art greetings cards.

 

WHERE CAN YOU BUY My CARDS?

My main fine art greetings card stockist is Malborough Post Office where all 65 designs can be found.

But my cards are also on sale at the Salcombe Information Centre, Bonningtons the newsagents in Salcombe, The Gallery @ Avon Mill, The Gallery Project at Noss Mayo, Bloomers the florists in Kingsbridge – and direct from me.