The second marriage at NGV

Postcard from Melbourne: So much to see at the NGV

While Anne and a writer friend of hers chatted over afternoon tea in the first floor restaurant, I discovered just how much there is to see at the NGV (National Gallery of Victoria).

 

What is there to see at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV)?

In addition to the wonderful David Hockney exhibition which I blogged about on 9 January, NGV has so much more art to show to the world.

Alfred Felton’s generous bequest in 1904 has enabled the NGV to be a world-leading collecting institution. There is work by Picasso, Rothko, Bacon, Man Ray, Max Ernst, Paul Nash, Bonnard, Rodin, Van Gogh, Pissaro, Renoir, Manet and Monet, Courbet, Constable and, of course, Turner.

 

What were the highlights for me?

Thinker at NGVDegas at NGV(Left) Rodin’s The Thinker: it was well worth spending time, admiring his undoubtable handiwork.

Rodin’s The Kiss is one of Anne’s favorites and we’ll have to arrange a return visit to NGA before we leave Australia so she can see The Thinker too ‘in the flesh’.

Manet’s The House at Rivell was also breathtaking, and was attracting quite a crowd.

(Right) Degas’ Portrait of a Woman, identity unknown … clearly, she was known to him!

John Constable’s Study of a boat passing a Lock – wonderful!

And, my featured image at the top of this blog post, is David Hockney’s The Second Marriage. … It’s an interesting, different, study of this state of existence. I’m on mine and loving it – and the painting was great too.

 

You want to see some more photos?

Picasso at NGV

(Left) This is a Picasso vase. Lord alone knows how much it is worth. It’s on display within a sturdy glass cabinet. Very sensible!

Van Gogh at NGV

(Right) This is Head of a man by Van Gogh. Although Van Gogh tried to conform to the traditional approach, his passion enlivened this work so much that it has much more power emanating from the canvas than other portraits of that era.

I spent such a short time, wandering around, amazed at the collection of treasures, and now need to schedule some time for a return visit.

However, Anne and I depart for a week in Tasmania tomorrow so you can expect a report of our planned visit to MONA before I get a chance to return to see what Melbourne’s art galleries have to offer the visitor.

If you have visited Tasmania, or live there, what galleries – apart from MONA – would you recommend we visit?

This post is one of my POSTCARD series, sharing all things ART with you when I go travelling.

Postcard from Melbourne, Australia: The David Hockney exhibition at the NGV

This is a new type of blogpost: a postcard from Melbourne, prompted by our visit to the NGV to see the David Hockney Exhibition.

We are currently ‘on holiday’, visiting family, but wherever we go, Anne and I always make a point of seeking out art galleries, museums and gardens.

 

What’s on in Melbourne?

The NGV (National Gallery of Victoria) in Melbourne, Australia, is currently hosting a David Hockney Exhibition. It’s just across the road from the beautiful Royal Botanic Gardens and both are walking distance from the famous Federation Square, opposite Flinders station.

We have to catch the 86 tram to get into Melbourne and it takes about 30 minutes. The ride is interesting enough, looking at the various architectures en route.

 

What did I think of the David Hockney exhibition?

The day we visited the David Hockney exhibition, it was particularly hot and we were glad to be inside, in an air-conditioned space.

I had seen a similar exhibition at the Royal Academy in London, but this one included animated film of Hockey creating his masterpieces using an iPad. It was truly inspirational.

I have only been an iPad user for three years and, although I have the ProCreate app installed for a while now, I had not really come to grips with the opportunities it offers to artists.

So, since our visit to NGV, I have been ‘playing’ with ProCreate on my iPad. I don’t suppose for a moment that I’ll ever publish a finished piece emanating from this new technology – I’m far too old to change my spots! – but I can see how much David has achieved since he embraced this format.

 

Is it worth your visiting this exhibition?

Even Anne, who is not overly impressed with modern art, was mesmerised by the many animations. Or perhaps it was just her tactic to stay in the cool environment?

The exhibition is on until 13 March and I recommend – if you are within striking distance of Melbourne – that you take time out to visit this glorious display of so many of David’s paintings, including more than 20 portraits.

This post is one of my POSTCARD series, sharing all things ART with you when I go travelling.

New Year Resolutions

It’s that time of year again, when we reflect on the past twelve months and make New Year resolutions.

I’ve decided, after half a century of sailing and more than 25 sailing a Solo, to hang up my wetsuit and sell my boat – Don’t Wait Up – to a younger man. The Solo before last was called Back Soon but I never was …

I’ve also hung up my spade and relinquished the shed key for allotment 5E. I wish the new incumbent many happy hours of digging and cropping, while enjoying the most amazing view across the estuary and hills beyond.

 

What will I do with my time in 2017?
Always to the Hills, by Nikky Corker

Always to the Hills, from an original painting by Nikky Corker

I’ll be mostly painting, although, as this year’s birthday card from wife Anne hinted, we need to spend more time together, walking and enjoying the fresh air and beautiful countryside while we still can.

Anne purchased the card from Ashburton Post Office where they have a great range, including ones by the artist, Nikky Corker. In this one, Nikky captured these aging but fit folk heading for the hills. Us in 2017?

We’ve lived here in Salcombe for more than a decade now. While we enjoy fortnightly visits to the chiropractor in Ashburton, and make a point of buying fresh fish at the excellent Fish Deli, we rarely make time to head up to the moors.

Such excursions are clearly high up on my list for 2017!

 

What am I planning to paint in 2017?

The first challenge is to create enough new artworks for the Salcombe Art Club Main Exhibition – and handing in day is Saturday 1 April.

As a full member of the club, I’m invited to exhibit five new original paintings. I had better get my skates on!

 

What art classes will I attend in 2017?

I’ve already booked to attend Michael Hill’s watercolour / acrylic class on a Tuesday plus the full-day oil class with Ian Carr on a Friday. I’d also sign up for Ian’s Tuesday evening but I know I’d be too tired after a full day class with Michael!

Attending these classes is a great opportunity to meet with fellow artists and enjoy their company while learning more and more techniques.

 

Where are the classes held?

All classes are in the Loft Gallery, the home of Salcombe Art Club.  The Loft Gallery is situated behind the Fortescue Inn, and above a popular shoe shop, on a delightful footpath called Victoria Quay. And, Low Tide at Fishermans Cove – the featured image above – is the view from Victoria Quay.

 

See you there?

I can thoroughly recommend your joining Salcombe Art Club and attending classes between now and when next year’s Exhibition open at Easter time.

Make it your New Year’s resolution? See you there!

Contemporary Art

News: Ian Carr and Jon Woolfenden

It’s holiday time and yet Ian Carr, one of my tutors at Salcombe Art Club, is in the process of refurbishing his studio!

Ian’s Sail Loft in Shadycombe Road, at the bottom of Coronation Road, is being transformed to create the Contemporary Art Studios.

Ian has teamed up with Jon Woolfenden, formerly of Hope Cove Gallery in Island Street, in this exciting new venture.

 

Wine and nibbles!

Ian and Jon invite you all to drop by for wine and nibbles: 11am – 5pm, 28 December until 7 January.

 

When will the new Contemporary Art Studios be open?

The new Contemporary Art Studios – to include a downstairs gallery – is due to open at Easter 2017.

 

More on Ian Carr?

Ian CarrIan studied at Chester School of Art, Leeds College of Art, and Manchester University.

He taught art in UK and Zambia, and has been a gallery director and copywriter.

Founder of the Bunker Project, Ian has exhibited widely throughout the UK.

Ian is a very experienced Salcombe-based artist who loves teaching and sharing his enthusiasm.

 

Sign up for Ian Carr’s classes at Salcombe Art Club

Oil paint is a forgiving medium and ideal for anyone who has limited experience of paint; it builds confidence and invites experimentation.

Ian’s courses – one full day or one evening – are suitable for the experienced, not so experienced and the absolute beginner.

  • Evening Oil painting with Ian Carr Cost £70. 10 weeks: Tuesday evenings 7-9pm, January 17th – March 28th (no class on February 21st)
  • Oil painting with Ian Carr Cost £140. 10 weeks: Fridays, 10am – 3.30pm, January 20 – March 24

 

Contact Ian Carr to book or to ask questions.

ianfcarr@btinternet.com www.ian-carr.com

Telephone: 01548 854211

135-christmas-camellias

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you all!

What’s my news?

WIP

Anne and I are on vacation in Australia, visiting family and enjoying some c.

Meanwhile, work continues on our home – and my gallery – in Salcombe.

What’s happening at Beacon House?

A platform lift is being installed to make the house wheelchair friendly, and this involves the complete reconstruction of the front half of the property.

This photograph shows the work-in-progress of the uppermost floor. As you can see, there is currently nowhere to hang my paintings!

I’ll keep you posted on developments, and we will have a celebration when the new gallery is ready for visitors.

Watch this space!

 

Where can you see my original paintings?

All the galleries, including my own, are enjoying a well-earned break so I have no paintings available for sale for a while yet.

The first exhibition on my list for 2017 is the Salcombe Art Club Main Exhibition which opens on Thursday 13 April.

You can still buy my affordable art though: my fine art greetings cards.

 

Where can you buy my fine art greetings cards?

For the full range of 59 cards, visit Malborough Post Office.

Other stockists carry a selection:

  • Bonningtons, the newsagent in Salcombe
  • Salcombe Information Centre
  • Bloomers, the florist in Kingsbridge
  • Project Gallery at Avon Mill, and at Noss Mayo

On show: The Quay at Newton Ferrers

The Quay at Newton Ferrers is another of my paintings on show at the Gallery Project in Noss Mayo until 23 December. TODAY!

 

Last chance to visit the Project Gallery, Noss Mayo in 2016

The gallery closes today so it’s your last chance to view my paintings there for a while.

Sadly, the Yealm hotel is also closed but the water’s edge and the mornings with their craft make a lovely scene. Masses of different craft appear to be at odds with one another.

 

What is the building in the picture?

I believe it to be a converted lifeboat station. It is clearly of sturdy construction.

 

Is it a good place to moor up?

I have moored here in the past but with great care, as the tide is very strong – not one you can swim against.

 

What was the attraction? Why did I paint this scene?

Simple! It’s beautiful. And romantic.

Nature’s greens meet at water level as the trees leave constantly move to kiss the water’s ripples.

 

Where is The Gallery Project, in Noss Mayo?

The Gallery Project is in The Revelstoke Room, next to the Village Hall

Post code: PL8 1EN

Tel: 01752 873150

Open now, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 11am until 5pm, until 23 December.

On show: Newton Ferrers from Noss Mayo

Newton Ferrers from Noss Mayo is another of my paintings on show at the Gallery Project in Noss Mayo until 23 December.

 

You’ve not yet visited the Gallery Project in Noss Mayo?

This light, contemporary space provides the perfect setting to showcase art and craft from South Devon. It’s well worth a visit!

Maxine, who runs the Gallery Project has several of my originals on the show, all depicting scenes of these two locations: Newton Ferrers and Noss Mayo.

 

What’s so special about Newton Ferrers and Noss Mayo?

At low tide, there are causeways to help pedestrians cross the water between the two villages of Newton Ferrers and Noss Mayo.
In addition, the three pubs are ideally sited from an artist’s point of view.

In this painting, I was positioned by Point Cottage only a few paces from the Ship Inn and the sun shone for as long as I needed it.

 

Where is The Gallery Project, in Noss Mayo?

The Gallery Project is in The Revelstoke Room, next to the Village Hall.

Post code: PL8 1EN

Tel: 01752 873150

Open now, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 11am until 5pm, until 23 December.

Contemporary Passions

On show: The Great Mewstone

As mentioned in a previous blog post, Maxine, who runs the Gallery Project at Noss Mayo has several of my originals on show at the moment. One of those is today’s featured painting with The Great Mewstone rising out of the sea while tide, wind, and currents scar the sea surface with competing patterns. It is hard to take in the distant shores of Cornwall.

 

What’s my connection with The Mewstone?

Not a pleasant one, unfortunately! On my first visit to the Yealm with two sailing chums, I was persuaded to accompany them to the Mewstone by boat. I thought we were going to moor up and explore … but no, they wanted to dive and try out their harpoons and needed me to stay on board while we were anchored for safety purposes.

As I hadn’t come along with a wetsuit and they had, I agreed. About 40 minutes later, they returned with their harpoons but no fish or lobster to be seen. However, I had changed colour! I had discovered seasickness. It took several pints for me to find my ‘land legs’!

 

Where can you see this painting?

The Great Mewstone is on display at The Gallery Project, in Noss Mayo. This light, contemporary space provides the perfect setting to showcase art and craft from South Devon and is open now, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 11am until 5pm, until 23 December.

 

Where is The Gallery Project, in Noss Mayo?

The Gallery Project is in The Revelstoke Room, next to the Village Hall.

Post code: PL8 1EN

Tel: 01752 873150

On show: Low Tide at Newton Ferrers

The Beacon House Gallery is closed for refurbishment until next spring, and the Salcombe Art Club exhibition space is now being used for classes, but you can still see my original paintings on show in various galleries in the South Hams.

One such opportunity is at The Gallery Project, in Noss Mayo. This light, contemporary space provides the perfect setting to showcase art and craft from South Devon and is open now, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 11am until 5pm, until 23 December.

Maxine, who runs the Gallery Project has several of my originals on show, and one of those is Low Tide at Newton Ferrers.

 

I live in Salcombe. What am I doing, painting scenes of Newton Ferrers?

It was probably in the late 1960s that I was introduced to the two villages of Newton Ferrers and Noss Mayo. I spent many happy holidays there and still have friends living there.

The Ship Inn (and other venues) offer excellent food with wonderful views. So, it’s a treat to venture away from Salcombe now and then and to enjoy such picturesque scenes.

Last summer, Anne and I, on two separate occasions, took house guests in that direction. Once I start taking photos, it’s not long before I’m compelled to start painting … and those two visits explain the recent crop of paintings of Noss Mayo and Newton Ferrers.

 

Why paint the boathouse?

Low Tide at Newton Ferrers depicts a prominent luxury boathouse as viewed from Noss Mayo. Its setting is idyllic!

Beyond the boathouse, we can see the tops of masts and sails of crafts finding their moorings in the river Yealm.

Better to ask why not paint the boathouse?

 

Where is The Gallery Project, in Noss Mayo?

The Gallery Project is in The Revelstoke Room, next to the Village Hall

Post code: PL8 1EN

Tel: 01752 873150

SNAP! Mist at Calstock Viaduct

Inevitably, in the winter time, poor weather forces me to delve into my stock of inspirational photographs and I usually restrict myself to my own snaps. Not so, in the case of Mist at Calstock Viaduct.

During one of our regular catch-ups over lunch, a dear friend (who will remain nameless!) related a story of a boat expedition on the Tamar and drew my attention to the beautiful sight which he and his wife had witnessed – and photographed: a superb misty dawn while they moored up alongside Calstock Viaduct.

I loved the image and, with my friend’s permission, I took the opportunity of interpreting the scene.

Painting a watercolour of the Mist at Calstock Viaduct – and capturing the atmosphere – was hard work. Not one to give up, and since I enjoy the challenge of putting aside say watercolour or oil and, instead, seeing how acrylics respond to an image, I produced another artwork and was much happier with the acrylic version of this wonderful structure.

For the joy of painting this image, I have both my photographer friend to thank, and Brunel the engineer, who designed the viaduct.