Tidal Gallery: Wild Spring exhibition

Wild Spring advert for Tidal Gallery

Today, this evening from 5.30 to 7.30pm, is the launch of the Wild Spring Exhibition at the Tidal Gallery, Kingsbridge.

Once again, Anna Ventura has brought together a fascinating group of artists:

  • Richard Thorn
  • Ayse Rifat
  • James Savage

I own a Richard Thorn watercolour and much admire his work. This painting hangs in my sunroom, and is always an inspiration to me when attempting watercolour. The intensity of colour he achieves is breathtaking.

Richard Thorn watercolour

Richard currently holds the title of South West Academician (SWAc) and has won awards by the Royal Institute for painters in Watercolour in 2016 and 2017. I am very much looking forward to meeting him and seeing more of his work at the Tidal Gallery.

Ayse Rifat is wildlife artist working in oils and acrylics. Her aim is to capture each detail and she produces final pieces with intense realism.

Ayse Rifat: work of art at Tidal Gallery

Ayse is a fellow member of the South Hams Art Forum (SHAF) and works as a freelance designer – her projects range from web design to brand creation. A very talented lady!

James Savage is a ceramics artist and his works are reminiscent of the colours of local stone. Beautiful!

James Savage: works of art at Tidal Gallery

Where is the Tidal Gallery?

1 Victoria Place, The Promenade, Kingsbridge, Devon TQ7 1JG

There is free parking on the opposite side of The Promenade and, at a cost, in a nearby carpark. More details, including directions, are available on the Tidal Gallery website.

When is the exhibition open?

The Wild Spring exhibition is on from tomorrow until 15 July, so you have plenty of time to pop in during the next couple of months if you are not able to attend this evening’s launch.

If you have an exhibition that you’d like me to promote via my blog, contact me and I’ll do my best to support your artistic endeavours.

Postcard from Lukesland: Elaine Sibley

If you have never visited Lukesland, close to Ivybridge, it’s time to do so, soon. This beautiful location boasts the most wonderful gardens and a tea room. And, in the tea room, you will find an exhibition of works of art by Elaine Sibley.

Elaine’s approach to the moors is unique. She captures the depth of the wild landscape and its response to the ever-changing light as the weather crosses this area of extraordinary beauty. Her tones record the incredible mixture of shades that make these views so memorable.

Anne and I attended the preview – a well attended event – and witnessed many of Elaine’s paintings being sold that evening. I was too slow in taking photos … this small one was snapped up before I could get my camera out!

The location is delightful with hanging space for more than a dozen paintings. This is the view from the end nearest the entrance to the tea room.

This is the other end, just beside the entrance.

And these paintings are the other side of the entrance …

Notice the red dot?

Where is Lukesland?

The Lukesland website provides detailed directions, but it is essentially north of Ivybridge, in beautiful countryside.

The final stretch is along lanes and requires faith that you’ll find it. Once you do, you’ll be delighted. If you are relying on your SatNav, the postcode is PL21 OJF.

When is Lukesland open?

Be sure to pick your day/date carefully as the gardens (and tea room) are only open occasionally.

31 March – 16 June: Sundays, Wednesdays and Bank Holidays
6 October – 17 November: Sundays and Wednesdays
11am – 5pm

Easter Openings: Good Friday, Easter Day and Easter Monday
NOT Easter Saturday

More about Elaine Sibley

Elaine lives and works on the edge of Dartmoor.

Elaine studied at Plymouth College of Art and then the College of St Mark & St John where she gained a PGCE. She taught Design and Technology for 20 years while designing and making silver jewellery which she continues to sell through local galleries and open studios.

Since retiring from teaching in 2016, Elaine  has found time to experiment and expand her work and has developed a passion for painting. To see more of Elaine’s images, visit her Facebook page.

You can contact Elaine by email at elainejsibley@gmail.com.

If you have an exhibition that you’d like me to promote via my blog, contact me and I’ll do my best to support your artistic endeavours.

All Aboard the East Portlemouth Ferry – in sale on 5 April

In the preview sale on 5 April, All Aboard the East Portlemouth Ferry is one of the latest crop of paintings which will be on show, and offered at a discount price to those attending this celebration of the start of another season of art.

 

All Aboard the East Portlemouth Ferry

The Ferry InnMy first visit to Salcombe in 1948 began with a ride on this vital ferry. I was only five years old and my father was determined to visit the Ferry Inn on the Salcombe shore. Cannot think why!

Since then, I visited Salcombe many times, eventually fulfilling my dream of retiring to Salcombe, moving here in 2007 and setting up my gallery at Beacon House five years ago.

This latest painting reminds me, yet again, of that first ride aboard the East Portlemouth Ferry, seven decades ago!

 

Defending the East Portlemouth ferry service

When the Salcombe lifeboat, Baltic Exchange III, was first launched, it was put on display at one of the London Docks adjacent to the London Boat Show. Members of the public were invited to go aboard and explore this state-of-the-art rescue craft. The lifeboat crew were on hand to escort – and explain its features to – those who came aboard.

One visitor asked Tricky if he had another job in addition to crewing the RNLI craft. Tricky replied, with some pride, that he was a ferryman.

‘What sort of job is that!’ exclaimed the pompous visitor.

Tricky explained that the East Portlemouth ferry service operated every day of the year. It was an honour, he said, to fulfil the long-standing obligations of the ferry service, one which benefited inhabitants of Salcombe town and East Portlemouth, and visitors too. I witnessed this exchange and echoed Tricky’s defence of the importance of this ferry service, and its vital role for those who needed to cross the water. Mr Pompous was not convinced and, unfortunately, left before we could throw him in the dock.East Portlemouth Ferry

Have you noticed that, during the quieter times, it always appears that the ferry is on the wrong side – the other side! – when you want it?

In my painting, I captured that classic moment, with the ferryman reading his book or newspaper.

This painting has long ago sold but is available as a greetings card and in the affordable art range of products.

 

Come to the Preview evening: 6-9pm on Friday 5 April

If you would like an invitation to the Preview evening, please contact me. You will be made very welcome at Beacon House Gallery.